Denver Startup Week is over, what’s next?

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Innovation takes action. That’s a core takeaway from Denver Startup Week and the APEX Conference the prior week.  Both events were jam packed with amazing entrepreneurs who told inspiring stories of perseverance and anecdotes of how they made their ideas a reality.  Now people are wondering if the energy and excitement generated by DSW will have a lasting impact.  That may be the wrong question to ask.

DSW shouldn’t be looked at in isolation. The event is the culmination of years of hard work and is predicated on the fact that a startup culture already existed in Colorado.  Before DSW there were small meetups in coffee shops, at bars and larger ones like New Tech.  DSW’s existence and subsequent success is actually a sign that Colorado’s startup community is growing stronger.  If the community is going to continue to mature, it’s going to take constant action.

“Do it yourself first,” is a principle espoused by the book Rework by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hanson (creator of Ruby on Rails).  Colorado’s most successful startup entrepreneurs are people who embrace this perspective, and it’s a trait that has weaved itself into the local DNA.  Entrepreneurs see gaps in the market, create solutions and provide services that consumers are compelled to buy.  They don’t always need a lot of money or government support, they just do it.

Colorado’s spirit of innovation has grown despite threats to its existence. Using outdated models for managing markets, regulators can stifle innovation or, even worse, stop it in its tracks.  While there’s an interest in protecting consumers from bad actors, regulators can sometimes overreach and prevent great ideas from reaching their full potential.

That’s why it’s important that entrepreneurs be the leaders of the startup community, a philosophy of Brad Feld’s “Boulder Thesis.”

Entrepreneurs are the best vessels to carry the message that innovation can’t be contained and the winners and losers should be chosen by the market.  Those with the ability to take ideas from conception to consumer should be rewarded and allowed to compete.

At the Coalition for a Connected West, we strive to generate a dialogue between entrepreneurs and policymakers so that innovation in Colorado can continue to thrive.  We have a great advisory board of thought leaders, who also happen to be entrepreneurs, and are compelled to get involved.  They are the ones who can have the most impact because they live it every day.

If the startup community in Colorado is going to continue growing, it’ll take a commitment from entrepreneurs to be both leaders of their businesses and of their communities.  Have awareness about the policies that affect your community.  Learn more and work with organizations like CCW, Rockies Venture Club, Innovation Pavilion and Colorado Technology Association to make a difference.  Take our future in our own hands.

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